Sunday, 21 August 2016

Mini quilt "Fear sits here" (Hier zit Angst)

A story by Elizabeth Gilbert(*) has inspired me to make a quilt that says "Fear sits here" (in Dutch: "Hier zit Angst"). On this quilt all the fears I sometimes have can sit down, so I can still do whatever scares me, but needs to be done. Fear can not be wiped away or eliminated. It is a part of you, but you can choose not to let fear govern your life. 
So I put fear here on this quilt, in the corner of the room. "I see you, I hear you, but I don't listen to you now, because you are not right this time."

Maybe it works: I have a job now, while sometimes appling for a job was pretty scary. 

The technique is inspired by Susan Carlson's method. The smallest pieces are glued, the yellow-green background is covered with organza and then everything is quilted in free motion.
As usual, I only used old scraps of fabric. 


Mini quilt "Fear sits here", made by Atelier YT



Mini quilt "Fear sits here", detail, made by Atelier YT

Mini quilt "Fear sits here", detail, made by Atelier YT

Mini quilt "Fear sits here", detail, made by Atelier YT

Mini quilt "Fear sits here", backside, made by Atelier YT

Mini quilt "Fear sits here", backside, detail, made by Atelier YT







(*) Facebook, Elizabeth Gilbert, march 16, 2016: 
http://bit.ly/2b9KhrM
Elizabeth Gilbert
16 maart
FEAR SITS HERE
Dear Ones -
A friend of this page named Charlotte Murphy sent me this photo the other day. She teaches art to fifth graders (first of all, GOD BLESS YOU FOR TEACHING ART TO FIFTH GRADERS, CHARLOTTE) and she has found that already, many of them are too locked-down by fear to be creative. (It starts so early, you guys. It starts so early.)
So, recently, she read them the section of BIG MAGIC where I talk about how fear is allowed to have a seat in the car, when we are being creative, but it's not allowed to drive.
The kids came up with the inspired idea that the art classroom should have a FEAR CHAIR, where fear will be allowed to sit —but not allowed to control everyone's creative process. Each child wrote their fears on the chair, just to get them out. (Please note, if you look closely, the fears range from "tests" to "football"...I love this so much.)
When it's time to create, the kids now understand that they have to send their fear to sit in the FEAR CHAIR...and then they can get back to work.
Notice that the kids don't try to banish their fear (because we all know that's impossible; fear always acts up and throws temper tantrums when we try to banish it) but they bravely give their fear a name, and then give their fear a nice, pretty, respectful chair to sit in. They acknowledge that fear will always be in the room...and then they get back to the business of making things, anyway.
It's such a beautiful idea, and I was so moved by this — by the handmade ritual (all my favorite rituals are handmade) of literally giving fear a seat, but not allowing it to take command.
Just wonderful, Charlotte — and so inspiring! Tell your students that I think they're geniuses, and that soon I'll be making my own FEAR CHAIR, which I will put in a prominent corner of my own writing room, where I can keep a close eye on it. I want my old familiar friend fear to know that I respect its right to be part of my life...but that it must keep its butt placed firmly RIGHT THERE.
In the corner.
And not one inch closer.
ONWARD,
LG

Thursday, 5 November 2015

Open European Quilt Championships 2015 - my quilt

Last week was the exhibition of the Open European Quilt Championships. This year for the first time in Maastricht. And for the first time I've submitted a quilt! It's the portrait of my grandmother (you can read the story behind this quilt under the tab "Quilting"). 

Of course I went to see my quilt hanging there between all the other 140 exhibitors. I felt so proud! My quilt is in the catalog and as a participant I received a set of quilting thread. That was a very nice surprise.

Furthermore, I've seen many splendid quilts and I've had conversations with very nice people from different parts of the world. Next year I'll be going again!


The quilts are hanging freely in the room, which gives a very spatial effect.
My quilt, made by Atelier YT
Myself, posing at my quilt.
The catalog


Wednesday, 21 October 2015

Felted blanket or shawl

I've posted pictures of this little blanket before, but in these phots's you can get a better look of the size. It's a nice and warm blanket, a little too thick for using as a shawl though. 

Felted Merino wool on etamine de laine (wool fabric), combined with a small shawl from the second hand shop. 

Felted blanket, made by Atelier YT

Felted blanket, made by Atelier YT


Saturday, 17 October 2015

Crochet shawl of 75-year old yarn

The end of last year I was experimenting with rayon (viscose) from the legacy of my grandmother. The yarn is possibly 75 years old. (See historical research yarn and start of shawl).

I crocheted a big shawl which was finished around Christmas last year. I didn't have the opportunity to take photos of it, but last month a made the time for it, with the help of a friend. Here are a few pictures of my shawl. 

The pattern is of Cascade Yarns, but I made the top edge and the fringe differently. Also, because my yarn was so much thinner than the one in the pattern, the pattern turns out much finer.
http://www.cascadeyarns.com/patter…/DK234_UltraPimaShawl.pdf



Crochet shawl, made by Atelier YT

Crochet shawl, made by Atelier YT
Crochet shawl, made by Atelier YT
Crochet shawl, made by Atelier YT
Crochet shawl, made by Atelier YT
Crochet shawl, made by Atelier YT







Infinity scarf - crochet

End of September I crocheted this warm long scarf. Just in time, because winter seemed to reach our country suddenly last week.

This long scarf has three buttons on one end, so you can make an infinity scarf. But the buttons fit anywhere in the scarf, so that it can be worn in many different ways, such as a cardigan. It is very soft and very warm, wonderful!

Yarn: Artesano superchuncky, 50% alpaca, 50% Peruvian mountain wool. Crocheted in the linen stitch, in three colors, with hook 15mm.


Crocheted scarf, double folded and fixed with buttons.
Crocheted scarf, double folded and fixed with buttons.
Crocheted scarf,nice and warm!
Crocheted scarf, worn as a cardigan.
Crocheted scarf, worn as a cardigan.
Crocheted scarf, loosely worn around the shoulders.






Monday, 12 October 2015

Developing a pattern for crochet scarf

Last summer I bought some gorgeous yarn to crochet a warm, soft scarf with for upcoming winter. The yarn is Superchunky by Artesano. I used a 15 mm hook. 

I got inspired by different patterns on the internet, but I wanted something different. That's why I developed a pattern by myself, simply by trying different stitches. 

It turned out that with this thick yarn a simple stitch with only single crochet (USA) is the most beautiful. Double crochet (USA) and complicated patterns make the scarf unnecessarily thick and coarse, and moreover: it takes too much yarn. I had only eight skeins, so I had to measure and calculate to get the right size.

Trying different stitches. 

I chose the linen stitch, which is simple, but creates a lovely effect in multiple colors. 
Then I calculated how wide the scarf had to be. I wanted to wrap the scarf around my body like a cardigan, so I needed approximately 1.80 m. length. By crocheting a sample of one skein, I could measure and calculate how long the scarf would turn out. The brown one in the picture is too short, the green one is good.

Measuring and calculating....
The scarf in progress.

The final result, see my next post!




Sunday, 21 June 2015

Sculptural Felt International - exhibition in Horst, the Netherlands

Sometimes I am so busy with all kinds of things, that I do find the time to go to exhibitions and museums, but don't have time to post about it here. So that's why I show some of my photos of this exhibition just a few months later. The artwork is of such a high quality that it deserves to be shown and it's worth a visit. So, if you happen to be in Australia, you can still see this great exhibition.

I visited the Sculptural Felt International exhibition last april at Museum De Kantfabriek in Horst, the Netherlands. Here is a short impression. 


The exhibition is now in Australia: 
6th of June - 18th of July 2015 at Tamworth Regional Gallery, Australia;
5th of September - 29th of November 2015 at Wollongong Art Gallery, Australia.

More information about Sculptural Felt International and the artists: www.alligt.nl/sculptural-felt-international.html




Marjolein Dallinga makes object based upon feelings, thoughts and dreams. The sculptures are the movement from fiber to felt. I love her work. Her objects seem to grow in nature. There's so much to see.
Marjolein Dallinga, Canada.
Marjolein Dallinga, Canada.


Stephanie Metz explores how humans manipulate life forms. She makes fantasy objects that seem real, like the skull of a teddy bear.
Stephanie Metz, USA. 
Stephanie Metz, USA. 


Chung-Im Kim makes reliefs of industrial felt with digital techniques. All pieces are hand sewn together and the loose threads are not eliminated. The tapestries are intriguing to look at because of the shapes and relief.
Chung-Im Kim, Canada. 
Chung-Im Kim, Canada.
Chung-Im Kim, Canada.


Anita Larkin combines felt with modern discarded objects. Her sculptures refer to human interaction and miscommunication. At first glance, the objects may look funny, but they can evoke many thoughts and emotions. "Cradle" I really like: a kind of pelvic bone and a baseball glove create together a safe cradle.

Anita Larkin, Australia. "Pivot", 2014
Anita Larkin, Australia. "Pivot", 2014
Anita Larkin, Australia. "Cradle", 2014


Kitty Korver has worked as a ceramist and that is reflected in her work. She makes clean scale forms of felt, from which she cuts graphic shapes that are filled with needle felt. These are powerful objects that are beautiful both in a group and separately.
Kitty Korver, the Netherlands. 
Kitty Korver, the Netherlands. 
Kitty Korver, the Netherlands. 
Kitty Korver, the Netherlands. 
Kitty Korver, the Netherlands.


Rebecca Howdeshell applies texture and dimension to industrial felt by machine embroidery. She associates her work with archeology: it looks like bone prints. They also could be maps of towns, rivers or landscapes. The stitching of the felt is a nice mixture of felting and quilting.
Rebecca Howdeshell, USA.
Rebecca Howdeshell, USA. 
Rebecca Howdeshell, USA.


Jantine Koppert uses industrial felt to create images that have a positive influence in living areas, because of their color and sound-deadening properties. Her work is inspired by nature. This large object in red and blue seems to dance through the room, I find it very cheerful.  
Jantine Koppert, the Netherlands.
"The Essentials I & II", 2014
Jantine Koppert, the Netherlands.
"The Essentials I & II", 2014